Discipline is Part of the Job

Discipline Is Part of the Job

 
 

Communication is always a key motivator.

While it’s never easy to discipline employees under your watch, it’s often necessary. Simply put, discipline is part of the job.

 

Discipline is Part of the Job

By Jim Callahan, Contributing Editor

While it’s never easy to discipline employees under your watch, it’s often necessary. Simply put, discipline is part of the job.

 

It has always been my experience that when it comes to employees, corrective action should be done at the time of the offense.

To delay action really amounts to procrastination and that hurts you as well as the employee involved because the emphasis on the particular policy or regulation you are trying to enforce erodes proportionally with the time it takes to remind the worker of the right step he or she should have taken in the first place.

Rather, administering discipline is like that old adage of pulling off an adhesive bandage: fast and clean. Do it while the incident is fresh in both your minds and make sure the punishment is fair and the worker understands why such action was taken.

DUE PUNISHMENT
For me, a minor first offense often warranted a verbal warning. The offense—being late, talking on a cell phone or wearing an improper uniform can be corrected easily enough. Just make sure the individual is aware that any future occurrences might result in a written counseling. Inform them of not only what they did wrong, but also what the correct procedure is for the occasion. For items such as tardiness, dress code infractions etc., remind them how foolish it is to fail over such small and avoidable things.

How is someone to know they are doing wrong if they are not told? And, how can that individual get better on the job and reach their next plateau if you don’t make them aware of their infraction? Lastly, delaying such a necessary conversation causes ambiguity in the workplace. If company policy isn’t enforced consistently, it can cause confusion down the road.

LET THEM KNOW
A good employee wants to be informed when they err and a not-so-good employee needs to be told when they step out of line. It’s said that people don’t do what you expect, rather they do what you inspect. Inspecting performance falls under the guise and eyes of a supervisor and how well you inspect has a very direct bearing on how well your department will function and of course, how those above you will view it.

When it comes to rewards and discipline of staff at the store level, most instances aren’t black and white even if you follow policy closely. Here are a few considerations when it comes to inspiring better performance:
• If an employee has earned the status necessary to be promoted, earn a bonus or a raise in pay, communicating why it has occurred is equally as important as the administrative action. A constant course of communication is part of a strong employer-employee relationship, making all the wheels turn.
• Conversely, should an employee earn some disciplinary action, whether it’s a verbal warning, written notice or even something as drastic as a firing offense, swift action is merited. Also, good communication is vital throughout the process. Lack of communication—no matter the situation—eventually gums up the works.
• It’s important to note that good communication is a two-way street. Explaining company policy and proper procedure is essential, but listening to an employee explain why he or she fell short of a standard can provide great insight into what is going on in his or her life. As a result, it can help you manage in a more even, empathetic manner.

Quite often there’s a learning experience involved in such situations and hopefully such a situation enables the worker to grow into a contributing staff member, and hopefully fosters meaningful changes in how you deal with your staff.
I always look for the learning experience because we all wish to learn and get better. As supervisors, it’s our calling to get better and help others get better so that they can revel in the feeling of growth and perhaps, take better care of their own family.

I would be remiss if I didn’t remind you that taking the extra time and doing your due diligence to make absolutely sure that the person you are hiring is the right fit for the position will save you much anguish in the long run.

Once, they’re aboard, the real work can begin.

 

Full article can be found here.

 

Marks Take:

While it’s never easy to discipline employees under your watch, it’s often necessary. Simply put, discipline is part of the job.  Employees, corrective action should be done at the time of the offense.  Pulling off an adhesive bandage: fast and clean. Do it while the incident is fresh in both your minds and make sure the punishment is fair and the worker understands why such action was taken.  a verbal warning. The offense—being late, talking on a cell phone or wearing an improper uniform can be corrected easily enough. Just make sure the individual is aware that any future occurrences might result in a written counseling.  How is someone to know they are doing wrong if they are not told? And, how can that individual get better on the job and reach their next plateau if you don’t make them aware of their infraction?  When they err and a not-so-good employee needs to be told when they step out of line.  Earned the status necessary to be promoted, earn a bonus or a raise in pay, communicating why it has occurred is equally as important as the administrative action.  Earning experience involved in such situations and hopefully such a situation enables the worker to grow into a contributing staff member, and hopefully fosters meaningful changes in how you deal with your staff.  if I didn’t remind you that taking the extra time and doing your due diligence to make absolutely sure that the person you are hiring is the right fit for the position will save you much anguish in the long run.